F.A.Q.

Whale Jumping

Which departure time is the best for sightings?

Time of day has no bearing on wildlife viewing, and all of the departure times have equal opportunities to view the marine mammals.

Why can you not guarantee sightings?

As we are dealing with wild animals in their natural habitat it is impossible for us to predict exactly where they will be, as they are constantly moving.

What happens if we don’t see anything?

It is incredibly rare for us to go out on a trip and see nothing. As we operate out of an incredibly diverse area we usually see something, whether it be: killer whales, humpback whales, Minke whales, Dall’s porpoise, harbour porpoise, Pacific white-sided dolphins, Steller sea lions, or the occasional black bear down on the beach. Not to mention the great bird viewing and spectacular scenery?

Will we be able to go watch the whales rub on the beach in Robson Bight?

No, the rubbing beaches in the Robson Bight (Michael Bigg) Ecological Reserve are part of an area that is set aside specially for the killer whales to enjoy. Scientific observations have concluded that boating traffic, including kayaks and canoes, can be very disruptive to the whale’s resting and social behaviour in the Bight. No one (except researchers with permits) are allowed to enter the Bight by foot or boat?

Is there an age limit to go on the boat?

There is no age limit, and passengers of all ages are welcome to enjoy our trips!